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From the Back Office to the Front Lines: A Proposal Manager is Born

Sometimes we take a break from the serious business of cyber security blogging to get a bit more personal. Lunarliners are fascinating folk. We tell their story here.

For the past two years, I’ve been the office manager here at Lunarline. For those years, it’s been a pleasure to assist all the departments we have. I got to know who’s who and what everyone’s role is in the company. With that said, I wanted to “climb the corporate ladder”. I was interested in a couple of different avenues but decided to move towards the proposal/business development side of the business.

Honestly, prior to my transition, I was in a rut. It felt like Groundhog’s Day doing the same tasks day in and day out. When my PM and the director of federal sales approached me with this new position, I was ecstatic! They saw my potential for career growth. I felt quite honored that they would think of me for this position. We’ve never had a proposal manager before.

I was pretty hesitant about starting this new adventure. I had no experience in proposals or even working in the business development world, whatsoever. Sure, I helped out in some ways like editing, formatting, printing, binding, etc… but actually having the company relying on what I produce to make or break winning contracts?! Oh man, what pressure! PRESSUUURE!!

I dove right in as my supervisor dropped a RFP on my lap and said, “Go for it!” Clueless as to what I was supposed to do and cursed with a “supervisor” who gives me freedom; I was overwhelmed at first. But my response? –  “Bring it!”

After taking a deep breath and turning the first few pages of the RFP, I realized that the Federal Government is very demanding! 1 inch margins, 12 point font, they even want a specific font type, who does that? Papers can’t be printed double sided either, because oh no, we can’t be green and save the trees. Hunting down data calls from subcontractors is another ordeal while also being on top of 10 million other details the feds want. Logistics schmolistics. Multitasking at its best!

I have come to realize though that this position isn’t for everyone. A lot might be in over their heads if they aren’t an organized person. But I pride myself in being just that, very organized maybe even a bit OCD. Details, details, details! That’s what it’s really all about.

I feel like this position was truly a match made in heaven for me. It’s only been 4 months in my new position as proposal manager and I already like it. Who knew?! Learning new acronyms (there’s so many!), new terms and signing up for classes that would enhance my new career is just the beginning. I’m looking forward to soaking in all the knowledge that our super business development team has to offer. Give me a few more months and I’m taking over this proposal world!

Brain: We must prepare for tomorrow night.

Pinky: Why? What are we going to do tomorrow night?

Brain: The same thing we do every night, Pinky – try to take over the world!

From the ‘Pinky and the Brain’ animated series

About Sharon Sung

For over 13 years Sharon Sung stayed hidden in the corporate shadows, a quiet administrative assistant, doing quiet assistanty things. Day in. Day out. But Sharon lived a double life. Since the ripe old age of four she's been tearing up the classical / hip-hop fusion scene, winning competitions and mentoring other young musicians. It was only a matter of time until Lunarline's marketing department caught wind of all this latent creativity. Sitting in the lobby. Answering phones. Filing things. And as soon as they did they yanked her off the receptionist desk so fast that her chair is still spinning. Seriously, everyone who visits Lunarline HQ gets totally creeped out by this empty, spinning desk chair. But we don't care! Lunarline now has one of the industry's most talented proposal managers. And our competitors should be afraid. Very afraid. Creepy-haunted-empty-spinning-desk-chair afraid.